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British Architecture

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British Home interiors

Posted by on February 7, 2023 – 03:25 pm

British Home interiors

I ve been living in London for nearly a decade now, having moved here from Canada as a bright-eyed university graduate, in search of tea and adventure. Through my friendships and work as an interior designer (not to mention my work for Apartment Therapy— I love a good House Tour snoop), I ve been lucky enough to have been invited into countless English homes over the years, from Cornwall to Yorkshire and nearly every county in between. While every one is different, and I do hate to generalize, there are a few broad-reaching themes that I ve come…

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British Gothic Architecture

Posted by on January 6, 2023 – 02:53 pm

British Gothic Architecture

Salisbury Cathedral Gothic architecture in Britain has been neatly divided into 4 periods, or styles. The person who did the dividing that has been obediently followed by subsequent generations of writers and historians was Thomas Rickman (1776-1841). In his 1817 work An Attempt to Discriminate the Styles of English Architecture from the Conquest to the Reformation (whew! what a mouthful!) Rickman labeled the styles Norman, Early English, Decorated, and Perpendicular. Like any classification system in the arts these styles cannot be dogmatically…

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RIBA Awards

Posted by on October 18, 2022 – 01:19 pm

RIBA Awards

Image copyright RIBA Image caption The hospital, motorway services and abbey were among 46 projects honoured A grass-roofed children s hospital, an abbey, and a tranquil motorway services have been honoured by the Royal Institute of British Architects. The eclectic list includes a London museum and an Essex housing estate. A shimmering stainless steel library in Oxford, designed by the late Dame Zaha Hadid s firm, also made the list. Image copyright RIBA Image caption Cultural winners included the Portland Collection, HOME, York Art Gallery…

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British Museum Architecture

Posted by on October 10, 2022 – 12:48 pm

British Museum Architecture

The Reading Room stands at the heart of the Museum, in the centre of the Great Court. Completed in 1857, it was hailed as one of the great sights of London and became a world famous centre of learning. The Reading Room is currently closed. Design and construction By the early 1850s the British Museum Library badly needed a larger reading room. Antonio Panizzi, the Keeper of Printed Books (1837–56), had the idea of constructing a round room in the empty central courtyard of the Museum building. With a design by Sydney Smirke (1798–1877), work on…

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Association in London

Posted by on September 8, 2022 – 11:38 am

Association in London

Meeting with NBTA and CRT re: London Mooring Strategy On Thursday 26 May 2016, representatives of NBTAL (Marcus Trower, Helen Brice and Dave Mendes da Costa) met with Sorwar Ahmed (SA) and Matthew Symonds (MS) from CRT to discuss the London Mooring Strategy. The meeting was at CRT’s Little Venice offices in London. The meeting was open and had a positive tone with both sides wanting to work together on certain issues. Representation on working groups We said that we were happy to be in discussion with CRT and that future meetings like this would…

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British West Indies Architecture

Posted by on May 29, 2022 – 06:02 am

British West Indies Architecture

Location Anguilla, British West Indies Client AJCP Project Type Resort Renovation & Expansion 46 Guest Keys & Villas 120-Seat Cliff-Side Restaurant Event Deck and Meeting Rooms 2-Level Pool Spa The renovation of the Malliouhana Hotel & Spa represents an opportunity to bring an iconic resort – Anguilla’s first hotel property – back to the forefront of exclusive, luxury destinations in the Caribbean. The renovation of this 30-year-old hotel carefully balances two parallel goals – to preserve the historic hotel’s air of gracious…

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Norman Foster, British Museum

Posted by on May 24, 2022 – 05:40 am

Norman Foster, British Museum

The courtyard at the centre of the British Museum was one of London s long-lost spaces. Originally a garden, soon after its completion in the mid-nineteenth century it was filled by the round Reading Room and its associated bookstacks. Without this space the Museum was like a city without a park. This project is about its reinvention. With over five million visitors annually, the British Museum is as popular as the Louvre or the Metropolitan Museum of Art. However, in the absence of a centralised circulation system it was congested and difficult…

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19th century British Architecture

Posted by on February 17, 2022 – 01:44 pm

19th century British Architecture

The Industrial Revolution, underway by the middle of the 18th century and emerging first in England, is often cited as the single most important development effecting architecture in the modern world. The harnessing of coal and steam energy combined with new mechanized technologies and industrial materials, especially iron, steel and glass, brought sweeping changes throughout the fabric of society. Architectural commissions from ecclesiastical, royal and noble patrons were replaced by a new class of public authorities and private patrons, the leaders…

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Agriculture and health of your teeth: amazing connection

Posted by on February 9, 2022 – 06:15 am

Agriculture and health of your teeth: amazing connection

Agriculture is one of the most important branches of material production: breeding animals that are intended for agriculture and growing crops in order to obtain agricultural and livestock products. Agriculture includes various types of primary processing of animal and plant products. Today, everyone understands that agriculture is of great importance for the economy of the country as a whole and for the citizens of a particular country to be able to consume high-quality and tasty products from the counter, because the health of all buyers directly…

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Edinburgh Buildings

Posted by on January 8, 2022 – 12:22 pm

Edinburgh Buildings

The King s Buildings site is located on the south side of the city, approximately three miles from the centre of Edinburgh and can be accessed by car. The address of the King s Buildings is: West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG. Plan your car journey To plan your route to the University, you could use the AA or RAC Route Planner All you need to do it type in your origin and destination. Postcode details of University buildings are available from the University s Campus maps. Parking at the King s Buildings A number of University car parks are located…

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